Tag Archive: birdwatching


This summer I had the pleasure of watching many Barn Swallows feeding their young hatchlings. There were nests lined up all along the awnings, like a little bird community.

Adult Swallow

Adult Swallow #1

Swallow feeding hatchlings (1)

Time to eat!

Swallow feeding hatchlings (2)

NOM NOM NOM

Swallows in nest (2)

“You full?”

Swallows in nest (4)

“Yep, we are full.”

Swallows in nest (3)

“Oh good, time for a nap.”

Adult Swallow

Adult Swallow #2

Hatchlings chirping (1)

FOOD FOOD FOOD!!!

Hatchlings chirping (3)

YEAH FOOD, TIME TO EAT!

Hatchlings chirping (2)

Dinner, coming right up!

 

This video shows how flexible the Egret’s neck is while preening its feathers. This bird is so white, I can’t imagine how difficult it is to keep itself so brilliantly clean that it shines in the sunlight.

Its plumage seems like silky strands of flowing hair instead of the kind of stiff looking feathers that a bird generally has. It really is a beautiful bird to see in person.

I was so lucky the footage in this next video – one day on an impulse I got a ride to the wetlands and walked for a while, through some large mud puddles even. Then I spotted this glowing figure in a tree, it was almost like a ghost.

The Egret took flight and landed about 15 feet from me and began its hunt for dinner.

White Egret Flying

Its a heron? its a stork? NO!! Its Great White Egret!!!

Great White Egret (1)

Watching, waiting… with stillness that is unmatched.

Great White Egret (2)

This bird knows just when to strike.

White Egret Ripples

My favorite picture of the lot.

Great White Egret (5)

Meep? What happened, you are so thin from the front!!

Great White Egret (4)

Posed to strike.

White Egret Fishing (2)

Prey swallowed in one swift GULP!

 

Great White Egret (6)

Gracefully curved neck.

White Egret Fishing (5)

It strikes like a cobra!

Great White Egret (8)

I love how it thrusts its beak into the air and then walks slowly with its body, seeming as though it needs to catch up with its own neck.

Great White Egret (7)

White Egret Fishing (3)

White Egret Fishing (1)

Splash!

White Egret Fishing (4)

Another successful catch.

I got to watch a Great Blue Heron at the wetlands again, this time it seems to have caught something and ate it. If you watch closely you can even see it licking its beak.

 

A young starling has to be clever when eating its breadcrumb, there are bread thieves everywhere!

 

This (male) robin was up bright and early to get the jump on a whole bunch of grubs! I wonder if he has a nest full of little ones to feed?

During another trip to the wetlands we saw a heron, we think its a “green heron” … although it doesn’t look very green to me!

Its so interesting how this bird keeps its neck against its body, it has a longer neck than it seems!

green-heron-stretch

Just look at that stretch!

For the longest time I would hear this bird’s call and think that it was some other bird, perhaps a blue jay… Nope.

I’m really enjoying bird watching and how I am becoming more familiar with what birds are making what sounds in my area.

I also enjoyed reading this little snippet from wikipedia:

“The calls of the red-winged blackbird are a throaty check and a high slurred whistle, terrr-eeee. The male’s song, accompanied by a display of his red shoulder patches, is a scratchy oak-a-lee,[17] except that in many western birds, including bicolored blackbirds, it is ooPREEEEEom.[18] The female also sings, typically a scolding chatter chit chit chit chit chit chit cheer teer teer teerr”

I imagine that it could be very challenging to write out the sounds made by birds, but they appear to have gotten it fairly well.

On a visit to the wetlands we saw a Great Blue Heron, which coincidentally landed just as we got there. I’ve never been so close to a heron before, it was really magnificent. Here is the video, which is followed by some still shots.


heron-better-hd (1)

The above picture is the only shot of it that I got with my better quality camera before the battery died.

It was such a slow moving bird, when it moved it was so subtle that you wouldn’t have noticed it from afar.

heron-chest-floof

The Redwing Blackbird had good reason to be defensive, especially if it has a nest because the Great Blue Heron is a predatory bird and eats eggs and hatchlings.

Heres some action shots:

heron-bird-on-back

heron-vs-bird

heron-hit-and-run

 

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